What’s Coaching Got to Do with It?

Living a life with purpose gives you a reason to wake up in the morning. It tells you where you’re going and how you’re going to get there. Purpose isn’t genetic or something that happens suddenly it takes time, life experience and soul-searching. Choosing to live a life in recovery is a tremendous achievement, and with it comes limitless possibilities. Walking down new, sober avenues requires an open mind and an open heart that is willing to step into change and uncharted territory.

Learning from a coachLife’s way too short. This was the untimely recent loss Steps of Recovery that was published, Levin who reminds us that people would never know when it’s going to be our time to go. Yet, many of us live our lives in automatic pilot without considering what makes life worth living. Jason dedicated himself to being of service in the recovery community by providing experience, strength and hope through this publication a poignant and vivid example of purpose, passion and contribution, like this.

The purpose of this article is to offer a fresh perspective on the recovery process by introducing Recovery Coaching. Powerful, thought-provoking questions both existential and spiritual are an integral part of the coaching relationship and these conversations add a new dimension to the quality work already going on in the recovery community.

Currently, there’s confusion over the differences between coaching and therapy. Although coaching borrows from the world of psychotherapy, there are some specific distinctions. As a credentialed coach and licensed psychotherapist, I keep my two practices completely separate for legal and ethical reasons. I come from a psychodynamic background as a therapist exploring the influence of childhood on clients today. The following chart outlines the contrast between coaching and this particular school of therapy confusion over the differences between coaching and therapy.

Coaching

Focus on the present toward the future
Strengths-based, wellness model
Highly-structured with assignments
Phone-based or face-to-face
30-45 minute appointments
Short-term
Unlimited email contact between meetings

Psychodynamic Psychotherapy

Focus on the past toward the present
Deficits model focuses on healing
Process and feelings-oriented
Face-to-face
50 minute sessions
Short-term or Long-term
Minimal contact between sessions

According to a recent ICF survey, the average coach is 46-55 years old with 5-10 years coaching experience, and 53% of coaches have a graduate degree. Coaching clients tend to be 56% female and 44% male with an average age between 38-45 years old, credentialed coach and licensed psychotherapist, I keep my two practices completely separate for legal and ethical reasons.

Twenty-five years ago executive coaches were being utilized more and more in the corporate world, and in the 90’s life coaching rapidly emerged. Now in the 21st century Recovery Coaching has entered the scene. In 2005 I co-founded Recovery Coaches International (RCI) to bring together a community of coaches working in the recovery field, and in 2006 a certified Recovery Coach training program was established by RCI’s other co-founder. The International Coach Federation (ICF) is a nonprofit organization formed by professional coaches worldwide and has over 12,000 members in 42 countries. The ICF defines coaching fresh perspective on the recovery process by introducing Recovery Coaching.

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